By Stephen Le. From Ottawa Citizen. Published on June 23, 2017.

Somewhere else in Ottawa, a folk singer is serenading a crowd. Farmers display baskets of freshly picked produce. Sheep’s milk yogurt is sold here, alongside honey and wild boar meat. These farmers know where their food comes from, how it was sown and grown. Of course, farmers’ market prices will “surely always forever be beat” by supermarkets, but wedged within that price differential lie stirring exploits and a profound debate.

Chantal Gillet is the Joan of Arc of sheep farming, with visions of yogurt and ice-cream dancing in her head. After working as a structural steel estimator, a bout of cancer prompted her to question her diet. In 2010, for her birthday, while other people her age vacillated between soaking at a spa or vacationing in Cancun, Chantal bought herself a dairy cow along with milking equipment. She decided to tackle the sheep milk business in part because it was unusual. “I like to be different,” she says.

Gillet visited sheep farms in Europe, then spent six months puzzling over yogurt-making recipes before selling her first batch at a health food store. In the end, she succeeded beyond her imagination. Bridgehead became one of Gillet’s biggest customers.

 

Chantal Gillet visited sheep farms in Europe, then spent six months puzzling over yogurt-making recipes before selling her first batch at a health food store.  STEPHEN LE

 
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